How To Hand Knit A Blanket

Hand Knit Blanket or Throw

Have you ever seen those ultra chunky merino roving knitted blankets? Who I am kidding, of course, you have! They are absolutely everywhere on the internet! They look so cosy and inviting that you just want to jump out from your chair and into your computer. But you don’t have to pretend anymore. That’s right! You can make your own hand knitted blanket or throw using just your hands and roving. Even if you have never picked up knitting needles and attempted to knit before, you can still knit this gorgeous blanket. It really is a blanket for every skill level and it’s the easiest blanket you’ll ever make!

You can make your chunky hand knit blankets out of merino or acrylic roving to give them the cosy and bulky appearance, or you can use super bulky weighted yarn and still get the same knit-look appearance. Luckily for me, I have always wanted to make a blanket out of roving, even if there are bad reviews, so when my local craft store Spotlight in Queensland Australia had some in stock, I just had to buy some roving and give it a go! It’s called Moda Vera Bump and comes in a range of colours such as silver grey, rose (the colour I have chosen for my throw), frost grey, fox glove, faded denim and deep sea.

If you have always wanted to give hand knitting a go using roving that doesn’t break the bank, then I would definitely use this acrylic roving because it is still nice and soft and gives the same appearance as the more expensive merino roving.

You can read through the instructions below, or scroll all the way to the bottom of the page to find a detailed tutorial on how to hand knit a throw blanket.

Hand Knit Blanket Pattern

For a throw, I used 100m of roving and chained 12. If you want to make a blanket chain at least 24, or until you have your desired width for a blanket. Just follow the pattern below until you run out of yarn!

To begin, make a slip knot and chain your desired amount for the width of your throw/blanket using your hands (e.g. chain 12 for a throw). Make the chains tight enough so that there won’t be any large gaps in the blanket.

The last loop created from the chains will the be first loop for this section below

Make a loop using your hands in the second chain along by grabbing the strand of yarn connected to the ball from behind the chain, bringing the yarn through the chain to make a loop. Make a loop in the remaining chains all the way to end of the chain using the same method. E.g if you chained 12, you will have 12 loops.

Make sure the loops are the same length.

Now you will be working in the opposite direction that you just did e.g. if you worked left to right, you will be working right to left.

Row 1:

To create a new loop for row 1 and a knit stitch, grab the yarn connected to the ball from the last loop that you created, and pull the yarn through that loop from back to front to make a new loop (1st loop for row 1 and 1st knit stitch).

Go into the remaining loops, one at a time working along the row, grab the yarn from behind the loop and push it through that loop to make a knit stitch and new loop for row 2.

Continue this all the way to the end of the row, one loop at a time. If you chained 12 you will have 12 knit stitches and 12 new loops that will create row 2.

Now you will be working in the opposite direction that you worked in for row 1. So the last loop you created is the first loop you will use for row 2.

Row 2:

Grab the yarn and push it from behind, in through the last loop that you created from row 1 to make a new loop and the 1st knit stitch for row 2.

Go into the remaining loops, one at a time working along the row, grab the yarn from behind the loop and push it through that loop to make a knit stitch and new loop.

Continue this all the way to the end of the row. If you chained 12 you will have 12 knit stitches and 12 new loops that will create row the next row.

To make the throw or blanket longer repeat row 2 until you have your desired length. Remember to work in the opposite direction for each row for this hand knitted blanket to work. So if you just worked from left to right in the last row, you will need to work from right to left for the next row and so on.

Joining Multiple Strands of Roving Together

If you need to add strands of roving together, connect them together by either tying them together or open up one end of the roving and place the other strand of roving inside and roll them together, then twist the roving to secure the join. Just keep hand knitting once you have done this.

Casting Off

Once you have your desired length you will need to cast off.

Going in the opposite direction from your very last row, grab the 1st loop and 2nd loop and hold them together. Go through the 2 loops using your hand and grab the strand of yarn. Pull the strand of yarn through both loops at the same time to make a new loop and to cast off those stitches.

Using your hand, grab the new loop you just created and the loop directly next to that loop, and go through the 2 loops and grab the strand of yarn. Pull the strand of yarn through both loops at the same time to make a new loop and to cast off those stitches.

Repeat that process all the way to the end to be able to cast off the stitches.

To finish casting off, grab the new loop and the very last loop and go through the 2 loops. Grab the strand of yarn and pull the strand of yarn through both loops at the same time to make a new loop and to cast off those stitches.

You will have 1 loop left. Now pull the remaining yarn through the loop to make a knot.

Securing The Work

To secure the remaining yarn, you can use a felting tool and felt the roving into the blanket or throw. Or you can just evenly weave in the ends at the back of the work to hide the remaining yarn.

Once you have done that, your blanket is all ready to be used!

Pattern Notes

– Try to make your loops the same length every row so that the knit stitches look the same.

– I like to make the loops shorter so that the knit stitch will be tighter.

– Try to chain or cast on your stitches tightly so that you get a nice, even pattern on your blanket.

– Try to cast off your stitches using long loops so that the blanket won’t be pulled too tightly at one end of the blanket.

 

For more awesome projects and gorgeous patterns don’t forget to follow All Craft TV on YouTube, Facebook, PinterestInstagram and Ravelry. Thank you!

 

I know that watching how to hand knit is definitely better than my explanations above so here is the YouTube tutorial for you!

YouTube Tutorial

 

Here are just a few more crochet patterns I thought you might like from All Craft TV:


1.  Ocean Breeze Hooded Pocket Scarf

2. Parrots Call Scarf

3. Cobblestone Path Shawl 

4. Boho Triangle Shawl 

Selling made products from All Craft TV Patterns

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